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Editorial: Ophthalmic imaging – Nino Hirnschall

New innovations expand 
technical possibilities, says Nino Hirnschall

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Nino Hirnschall

Posted: Tuesday, October 1, 2019

I am delighted to be asked to write this guest editorial for this issue of EuroTimes, which has a special focus on cataract and refractive surgery. The cover story for this issue takes an in-depth looking at the evolution of ophthalmic imaging.
Ophthalmologists have at their fingertips an impressive array of imaging tools for diagnosing disease, guiding interventions and documenting progress after treatment. These tools are a key part of everyday cases, particularly cataract and refractive surgery, corneal transplantation, keratoconus detection and progression and ocular surface disease evaluation.
The level of detailed information provided by optical biometry, aberrometry, OCT imaging, keratometry and others continues to increase. While new and improved imaging techniques undoubtedly provide more information, questions remain about how much of an effect this might have on patient outcomes, and in which cases the cost of adding expensive new equipment can be justified.
EuroTimes takes a look at recent innovations in anterior segment imaging now in the clinic as well as ongoing research into novel imaging technologies that could provide a better understanding of fundamental questions still remaining about problems such as negative dysphotopsia and corneal ectasia.”
As well as our cover story, which deals with these new and exciting developments in imaging, there’s also an interesting article by my colleague Soosan Jacob, which takes a detailed look at various options available for anterior segment imaging in cataract and refractive surgery.
We have also just returned from a very successful Congress of the ESCRS in Paris, and in this issue you can see some of the highlights of the meeting including reports from presentations, award winners and picture galleries.

Dr Nino Hirnschall, VIROS – Vienna Institute for Research in Ocular Surgery, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna, Austria